Name of Organization   Lashkar-e Jhangvi (LeJ)
 
Formation  

LeJ was allegedly formed in 1996 as a breakaway group of Sipah-e Sahaba Pakistan (SSP) by its former members Akram Lahori, Riaz Basra and Malik Ishaque. These breakaway members proved to be the real hardliners. They were of the view that SSP is deviating from the guiding principles laid down by Haq Nawaz Jhangvi, the founder of SSP. LeJ has existed over the years as one of the most secretive organizations mostly involved in attacks on Shiite Muslims who they claim are Kafirs (Infidels).
 

Leadership   Muhammad Ajmal alias Akram Lahori is allegedly the Commander in Chief or Salar-e Aala of LeJ. He joined SSP in 1990 and as a founding member formed LeJ in 1996. He was allegedly involved in many incidents of Shiite massacre. He is presently under custody.
Riaz Basra, one of the most dreaded criminals in the history of Pakistan joined SSP in 1985. In 1988, he contested a provincial assembly seat from Lahore but lost. He later moved to Afghanistan for armed training. He was arrested in 1992, allegedly for the murder of a Shiite leader and an official (Iranian) of Khana-e Farhang, Lahore. He escaped from the police custody from the premises of a special court during 1994. He later formed LeJ with his companions and initiated the massacre of Shiite leaders. At times he was blamed for being a mole of government agencies. He was killed in 2001 by the Punjab Police near Mailsi, Multan in an encounter.
Malik Ishaque was also one of the most prominent leaders of the banned LeJ. He served more than a decade in police custody for many counts of homicide and murder. However, he was released in 2011 due to lack of evidence. Many believe that the witnesses retracted their statements after they were intimidated. Since his acquittal, the attacks on Shiites in Pakistan showed an upward trend, which many believe were due to Malik Ishaque’s acquittal. He was rearrested after the deadly bombing attack on Hazara Shiites in Quetta in February, 2013. On 29th of July, 2015, Ishaque was killed in a police encounter in Muzaffargarh along with two of his sons and eleven other militants.

Other prominent leaders of LeJ include:

• Qari Abdul Hai
• Qari Ata ur Rehman
• Mati ur Rehman
• Asif Basra
• Naeem Chotu
• Naeem Bukhari
 
School of Thought   Deobandi:

These are a significant group of Muslims present in the sub-continent, who adhere to the Sunni sect and follow the ideology of Imam Abu Hanifah. The school of thought is named after University of Deoband Dar ul-Aloom in India. They believe in safeguarding the teachings of Islam, while spreading the religion through preaching.

LeJ has its own extremist version of ideology, where it considers Shia sect as non-Muslims. They justify use of force against other sects in order to preserve their interpretation of Islamic values.
 

Structure of the Organization  

LeJ is known as a secretive organization. It is primarily composed on sub-units consisting of five to eight men. Each subunit is governed by a unit head. A subunit existing in an area is usually oblivious of the subunit and its activities in another area. The lack of communication between different subunits makes it difficult for the authorities to track their actions and movements. It is believed that after carrying attacks, a subunit splits up and reforms itself at another secret place.
 

Financial Resources  

According to reports, LeJ drives its funds from private sources in Arab countries. A number of businessmen based in Karachi are also said to be the supporters of LeJ. A number of LeJ cadres are also fund their activities by carrying out criminal activities.
 

Status  

LeJ was proscribed on August 14, 2001 by the Musharraf regime.
 

Recruitment tools & demographics  

The leadership of LeJ mostly hails from Punjab with the exception of its Balochistan leadership. LeJ recruits mostly from Deobandi madrassahs from across the country. It has carried out attacks on Shiite leadership and professionals across Pakistan.
 

Ideology  

LeJ considers Shiites as Kafirs or Infidels and supports its claims through religious decrees attributed to the various Deobandi scholars. LeJ considers Shiites as liable to death and is therefore involved in majority of the attacks on Shiite leadership and professionals. A number of its leaders (former and present) had played an active role in the war against USSR.
 

Areas of Operation   LeJ cadres have previously fought in Afghanistan alongside Taliban. They now operate throughout Pakistan and are mostly involved in attacks on Shiites. They have been most active recently in Balochistan, involved in the massacre of Hazara Shiite Muslims. Their operation stretches from Balkh and Kabul in Afghanistan along with its pence in Balochistan, Karachi, Punjab and the tribal areas of Pakistan

 

Linkages   LeJ has its linkages with a number of banned outfits operating in Pakistan. They were aligned with the Afghan Taliban in Afghanistan during the war. LeJ was formed as a splinter group of SSP and named the organization after the slain leader of SSP, Maulana Haq Nawaz Jhangvi.
LeJ, during the past few years have developed linkages with a number of Baloch militant organizations like Balochistan Liberation Army (BLA), Balochistan Republican Army (BRA) and Balochistan Liberation Front (BLF). With its resurgence, the group now has linkages with the ISIS (Daesh) in Syria and Iraq.
 
Tools   Print Media:

N/A

    Audio / Video:

Anti Shia Audios

Anti Qadiani Audios

Poems

 

Social Media:
SMS Service:
http://www.pringit.com/JHANGVI_MURSHAD/
http://www.pringit.com/AL_AZEEMAT_KHI_/

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/NshanNyNzamBdlo/photos_stream
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Secrets-of-SHIA/328418853870677
https://www.facebook.com/TheRealtyOfShia
https://www.facebook.com/NailaJhangvi
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Haqnawaz-jhangvi-shaheed/111857768917748
https://www.facebook.com/Vote.Jhangvida
https://www.facebook.com/NshanNyNzamBdlo 

 

web site   Websites
Working link:
http://jhangvimurshad.com/
Link not working:
http://www.kr-hcy.com/shaheed.shtml
 
Name Variations   IFollowing are different name variations that the group is referred to:
• Lashkar-e Jhangvi Al-Almi
• Army of Jhangvi
• Jaish-ul-Islam
• Jandullah
• IS - Khurasan

Who they are

Lashkar-e-Jhagvi (LeJ) is a Pakistan based Sunni militant and extremist group. They follow an Anti-Shia ideology in Pakistan. LeJ is involved in target killing of Shias, bomb blasts and Political activities. They have linkages with mainstream political parties

Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LeJ) is a Pakistan based Sunni militant and extremist group. They follow an Anti-Shia ideology in Pakistan. LeJ is involved in target killing of Shias, bomb blasts and Political activities. They have linkages with mainstream political parties. After the killing of its leader, Malik Ishaq, LeJ has been involved in prominent attacks; attack in Attock killing Punjab’s Home Minister Shuja Khanzada in 2015[4] and the attack on Police Training Camp Quetta in 2016 [5]

 

History

Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LeJ) is a splinter group of Sunni extremist organization Sipa-e Sahaba Pakistan (SSP). LeJ derives its name from its leader Haq Nawaz Jhangvi (Late). He was founder member of SSP. LeJ was formed in 1996 by Malik Ishaq, Akram Lahori and Riaz Basra. According to reports they have training camps in Pakistan and Afghanistan. They have small units in the districts of Punjab which work at district level.
In 2000 LeJ split into two groups due to ethnic conflicts. One was headed by by Riaz Basra and the other by Qari Abdul Hai also called as Qari Asadullah or Talha who was the chief of the Majlis-i-Shoora. It is reported that LeJ leaders are also involved in Tableghi congregations and also have linkages with Taliban militia, Al-Qaida, Jaish-e-Muhammad and Harkat-ul-Mujahdeen. LeJ was proscribed in Pakistan on August 2001 by Pervez Musharraf and declared a Foreign Terrorist Organization (FTO) in 2005.
Now two Jhangvi groups are operating in Pakistan one headed by Malik Ishaq and other by Maulana Ludhianvi. After the Malik Ishaq was killed, LeJ resurfaced as LeJ Almi in 2016, claiming the attack on Police Training camp in Quetta.

 

Organization's Message

LeJ follows Deobandi school of thought, they work on an anti-Shia ideology. Their messages (press releases and warnings) are based on this ideology. It was established to counter Iranian Islamic Revolution. They use violence to turn Pakistan into a Sunni state. They were Anti- Soviet and waged Jihad in Afghanistan.

Target Audience

LeJ’s target audience is mostly derived from Deoband madrasssahs. SSP and LeJ stem from similar roots and share their ideology. However, leaders of both the organization refrain from admitting it openly. The only difference between SSP and LeJ is that the former is the political wing, while the later is the militant wing; both are working to achieve similar goals.

Tools

They use both online and offline tools to engage or target community. They have Facebook pages with the name of their leaders, magazines, newspapers and outfit. Their members are available on Facebook on different pages under the name of the outfit. One page found with the name of Naila Jhangvi was found, which means that women are also involved to engage the target audience.
They are following a violent path against the Shia community. Their websites include audios, videos and literature against Shia and Ahmadis. They have links of SSP’s newspaper and Magazine (AL-Esar and Ablagh e Haq)

Click here to download compete detail of tools used by Lashkar-e Jangvi.

 
 

Splinter Groups

In 2000, news reports indicated that a split has occurred in LeJ. The resulting two factions were said to be headed by Riaz Basra and Qari Abdul Hai respectively.

 

 

References:

[1] Founding Philosophy: Lashkar-e Jhangvi. National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START). Accessed online from: http://www.start.umd.edu/start/data_collections/tops/terrorist_organization_profile.asp?id=65. Date of access: October 7, 2013.

[2] Lashkar-e Jhangvi: South Asian Terrorism Portal. Accessed online from: http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries/pakistan/terroristoutfits/lej.htm. Date of access: October 7, 2013.

[3] Basra’s Career: Dawn. May 15, 2002. Accessed online from: http://archives.dawn.com/2002/05/15/fea.htm#3. Date of access: October 7, 2013.

[4] Pakistan ‘militant leader’ Malik ishaque arrested: BBC News Asia. Accessed online from: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-21553492. date of access: October 7, 2013.

[5] Lashkar-e Jhangvi. National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START). Accessed online from: http://www.start.umd.edu/start/data_collections/tops/terrorist_organization_profile.asp?id=65. Date of access: October 7, 2013.

[6] IslamQA. Deobandis. Retrieved on: September 19, 2013. Retrieved from: http://www.islam-qa.com/en/22473.

[7] Stanford University. (2012). Lashkar-e-Jhangvi. August 03, 2012. Retrieved on: September 26, 2013. Retrieved from: http://www.stanford.edu/group/mappingmilitants/cgi-bin/groups/view/215.

[8] Lashkar-e Jhangvi: Institute for the study of violent groups. accessed online from : http://vkb.isvg.org/Wiki/Groups/Lashkar-e-Jhangvi_(LeJ). Date of access: October 7, 2013. 

[9] Lashkar-e Jhangvi: South Asian Terrorism Portal. Accessed online from: http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries/pakistan/terroristoutfits/lej.htm. Date of access: October 7, 2013.

[10] Lashkar-e Jhangvi: South Asian Terrorism Portal. Accessed online from: http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries/pakistan/terroristoutfits/lej.htm. Date of access: October 7, 2013.

[11] Ibid.

[12] Raza Khan. Quetta, Swat, Pakistan terrorist attacks and elections: Weekly Cutting Edge. Accessed online from: http://www.weeklycuttingedge.com/back-issues/Volume08-22/national01.htm. Date of access: October 7, 2013.

[13] http://www.start.umd.edu/start/data_collections/tops/terrorist_organization_profile.asp?id=65

[144] http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/asia-pacific/pakistan/130222/pakistan-malik-ishaq-arrested-lashkar-e-jhangvi

[15] http://www.shiaupdates.com/index.php/pakistan/6872-former-governor-punjab-says-pmln-makes-lashkar-e-jhangvi-stronger

 [16] http://pakobserver.net/detailnews.asp?id=197602

[17] http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries/pakistan/terroristoutfits/lej.htm 

[18] ibid

[19] ibid

[20] Lashkar-e Jhangvi: SATP. Accessed online from: http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries/pakistan/terroristoutfits/lej.htm. date of access: October 8, 2013.